Now accepting Telehealth appointments. Contact us to schedule a virtual visit.

Understanding How an Incompetent Cervix Can Affect Pregnancy

Incompetent Cervix, Darin Swainston, MD

Every expectant mother wants her baby to be born on time and healthy. The goal of every pregnancy is to deliver the baby at full-term, but sometimes complications arise that you aren’t expecting. About one in every 100 pregnant women is diagnosed with a condition known as incompetent cervix, which can make pregnancy difficult and premature birth more likely.

If you have incompetent cervix, your cervix opens before your pregnancy is full-term. As a normal pregnancy progresses, your cervix opens, shortens, and softens to prepare for birth. If you experience incompetent cervix, your cervix starts to open too early during pregnancy. This can cause problems and lead to miscarriage or premature birth.

Incompetent cervix, also called cervical insufficiency, can only be identified when you’re pregnant. Though identifying and diagnosing incompetent cervix can be difficult, Darin Swainston, MD, FACOG, uses a variety of tests to evaluate your condition:

All of these tests can help him accurately diagnose you and propose treatment to help your baby stay healthy.

What causes incompetent cervix

Incompetent cervix is the result of weakened cervical muscles. As your baby grows, more pressure is placed on your cervix, which holds the baby in place in your uterus. If you have a weakened cervix, it can begin opening before your baby is ready to be born.

You may have incompetent cervix if you experience:

Incompetent cervix is fairly uncommon, but if you notice these common symptoms, you should talk to Dr. Swainston about the condition. It’s also possible that you won’t experience any symptoms or pain with an incompetent cervix.

Women with uterine abnormalities or who have had cervical surgery in the past may be more likely to experience incompetent cervix during pregnancy. If you have a history of painless cervix dilation, you may be more at risk for cervical insufficiency.

How an incompetent cervix affects pregnancy

If you are diagnosed with incompetent cervix, treatment can help manage the increased risk to your baby. Untreated cervical insufficiency can lead to premature birth or miscarriage. If your cervix begins opening too early in your pregnancy, it increases the likelihood of complications.

Miscarriage occurs when the baby dies in the uterus before 20 weeks, and premature birth is when the baby is born before 37 weeks of pregnancy.

Your history of pregnancies affects your likelihood of developing cervical insufficiency. If you have had an incompetent cervix with previous pregnancies or if you have a history of premature birth or miscarriage, you’re more likely to have it during future pregnancies. If you have uterine injuries due to a previous birth, your cervix may be more susceptible to weakening as well.

Incompetent cervix treatment

If you’re diagnosed with incompetent cervix, Dr. Swainston can propose a few methods to manage the condition. He may recommend repeated ultrasounds to monitor your progress and the length of your cervix throughout your second trimester. Progesterone supplements can help maintain the strength of your cervix through your second and third trimesters.

For women with a history of premature births due to incompetent cervix, Dr. Swainston may recommend cervical cerclage, which is a surgical procedure where your cervix is stitched closed with strong sutures. These sutures keep your cervix from opening prematurely and are removed in the last month of pregnancy.

 

Dr. Swainston is here to help women have successful, healthy pregnancies. If you’re pregnant or trying to get pregnant, make an appointment with our caring team. Call our office today.

You Might Also Enjoy...

Do Ovarian Cysts Resolve on Their Own?

Ovarian cysts are a common gynecological condition. If you suspect you have one, you might wonder if you need medical attention or whether they’ll go away on their own. Keep reading to find out what you need to know.

Who Shouldn't Get a Hysterectomy?

A hysterectomy can address many conditions that affect your uterus and supporting structures. However, this minimally invasive surgery isn’t for everyone. Here’s a look at who should and shouldn’t consider a hysterectomy.

5 Common Causes of Pelvic Pain

As a woman, you understand pelvic pain related to period cramps. But if you’re experiencing chronic or severe pelvic pain, it could be a sign of an underlying condition. Take a moment to learn five causes of pelvic pain and how we can help.

What Happens if Endometriosis is Left Untreated?

If you have endometriosis, you’re not alone. Millions of women struggle with this painful, often disruptive condition, and many choose not to seek treatment. Keep reading to learn why seeking treatment is important and how we help.

Understanding Your Birth Control Options

You have many options when it comes to choosing birth control. But with so many choices, knowing what’s best for you and your body isn’t always easy. Here’s what you need to know.