Now accepting Telehealth appointments. Contact us to schedule a virtual visit.

Learn About the Noninvasive Treatment Options For Uterine Prolapse

Many intimate health issues are hard for women to talk about, and uterine prolapse is no exception. According to Harvard Health Publishing, uterine prolapse, or pelvic organ prolapse, is a best-kept-secret among women despite the fact that it’s an extremely common condition. In fact, if you and your friends are over 50, half of you have this health concern, but don’t discuss it.

At his practice in Las Vegas, Dr. Darin Swainston, a robotic gynecological surgeon, provides expert diagnosis and treatment for women with uterine prolapse. Here, he explains what uterine prolapse is and the noninvasive treatment options that can relieve uncomfortable symptoms, including a robotic approach that he developed.  

How uterine prolapse happens

As a woman, you may have been fortunate enough to experience the miracle of pregnancy and childbirth. However, pregnancy and delivering a baby also come with certain health “side effects.” While they may not reveal themselves right away, over time, weakened pelvic floor muscles no longer provide adequate support to hold your uterus in its correct position. When your muscles are weak or stretched from vaginal childbirth, a hysterectomy, or the changes of menopause, your uterus can slip out of place.

You might not even notice it at first, but as your uterus slips lower into your vagina, it’s not uncommon to experience uncomfortable symptoms such as:

Uterine prolapse typically affects women later in life, but it can also occur if you’re overweight, or have a chronic cough or chronic constipation.

Surgery isn’t the only solution

If you experience uterine prolapse, surgery isn’t the only option for correcting the problem, especially if your condition is minor. You may be able to prevent it from worsening by implementing some self-care strategies and lifestyle changes.

These noninvasive treatment solutions include:

A vaginal pessary is a silicone or rubber device that you insert into your vagina. It remains there and supports the bulging tissue from your uterus. You remove a pessary for cleaning and before intercourse.

A pessary can be helpful if you have mild or moderate pelvic organ prolapse. And it’s a good choice if you’re planning a future pregnancy, since it’s removable and there’s no surgery involved.

When nonsurgical treatment isn’t enough

If you have a more severe form of uterine prolapse, a surgical procedure may be necessary to eliminate symptoms and the chronic discomfort associated with a uterus that’s slipped out of place. As a robotic gynecological surgeon specializing in minimally invasive procedures, Dr. Swainston offers robot-assisted surgery for women with uterine prolapse. Dr Swainston has developed and pioneered a new technique to surgically repair POP robotically. This approach corrects the problem without mess and vaginal surgery, leading to excellent results.

Robotic surgery is less invasive than traditional types of uterine surgeries that either put the uterus back into its correct position or remove it completely with a hysterectomy.

If you do need surgery to reposition your uterus, Dr. Swainston recommends robot-assisted surgery since only tiny incisions are necessary for the procedure. Robot-assisted surgery reduces risks that come with traditional open surgeries and allows you to recover faster, too.

Ideally, if you can manage uterine prolapse through noninvasive treatment options, you may be able to avoid surgery. But if surgical treatment is inevitable, robot-assisted is your best bet.

If you’re concerned about uterine prolapse, effective treatment begins with a discussion with Dr. Swainston. Call to schedule a consultation at our Las Vegas office.

You Might Also Enjoy...

Do Ovarian Cysts Resolve on Their Own?

Ovarian cysts are a common gynecological condition. If you suspect you have one, you might wonder if you need medical attention or whether they’ll go away on their own. Keep reading to find out what you need to know.

Who Shouldn't Get a Hysterectomy?

A hysterectomy can address many conditions that affect your uterus and supporting structures. However, this minimally invasive surgery isn’t for everyone. Here’s a look at who should and shouldn’t consider a hysterectomy.

5 Common Causes of Pelvic Pain

As a woman, you understand pelvic pain related to period cramps. But if you’re experiencing chronic or severe pelvic pain, it could be a sign of an underlying condition. Take a moment to learn five causes of pelvic pain and how we can help.

What Happens if Endometriosis is Left Untreated?

If you have endometriosis, you’re not alone. Millions of women struggle with this painful, often disruptive condition, and many choose not to seek treatment. Keep reading to learn why seeking treatment is important and how we help.

Understanding Your Birth Control Options

You have many options when it comes to choosing birth control. But with so many choices, knowing what’s best for you and your body isn’t always easy. Here’s what you need to know.